Professional wrestling is one of the most popular and enduring sports in American history. Even if you didn’t watch professional wrestling in the 1980s and 1990s, it was hard not to know who the major players were.

Big stars like Ric Flair, The Rock, Stone Cold Steve Austin and Triple H were household names and growing up I loved it all.  The over-the-top stunts, the hilarious commentary of JR Ross and Jerry “the King” Lawler, and most importantly the strong women that appeared.

Women like Chyna, The 9th wonder of the world, showed me that there was nothing wrong with being a tall woman.  I was 5’10″ at 13 and nothing made me feel more self-conscious.  When I would see Chyna take command of the ring, I knew that beauty, brains and brawn were a trifecta of perfection that one should be proud of.  Women like Lita showed me that I could would hang with the toughest of guys, no matter how big a game they talked.   Every stunt the Hardy boys did, she could do it better.

And women like Jaqueline, were the first that showed me, me.

Jacqueline Moore as WWF Women’s Champion

“This is the real deal! I can beat everybody! Man or Woman!”

Jaqueline, born Jaqueline Moore, was the first African American WWF women’s champion and as of today is the only African American woman in the WWE Hall of Fame.  She was a fearless little woman from Dallas, Texas who talked a big game.  In the world where the Ivorys, Stacey Keiblers,and Sables reigned, Jacqueline was a queen in her own right. She still stands as the only woman wrestler to win and hold the Cruiser weight title under the WWF/WWE brand, a win she would obtain from Chavo Guerro Jr. of the famous Guerro family.  When she retired in the mid-2000s there was no doubt that her legacy would be a blazing trail for a whole host of women wrestlers from all backgrounds.


One wrestler that is making sure that black women are represented to the fullest is the beautiful and funny Naomi.

Trinity Fatu “Naomi” as WWE Women’s Smackdown Champion


Naomi, Trinity Fatu is currently one of the most popular wrestlers—man or woman—in professional wrestling. As a former Orlando Magic cheerleader and dancer for musician Flo-Rida, it’s no wonder how she puts on such an electrifying show every time she hits the ring.  Her motto, “Feel the Glow” invites you into her world of dazzlement and excitement.  Her intro is a glow in the dark, colorful dance ensemble that not only entertains but hypes up the thousands of fans in the stands.  She dazzles, dances, flips, and wows everyone in the room—and this is all before the bell even rings.  She holds her own as an amazing wrestler.  She is the two time and only African American Smackdown Live Women’s Champion and her athleticism in the ring is only matched by few. What I personally love the most about Naomi is her unapologetic black girl representation.  She’s quick to tell the other women how she will “snatch them bald” and affectionately refers to General Manager and wrestling legend Shane McMachon as “Zaddy” all while oozing the confidence of Muhammad Ali in his prime.

Naomi is a trailblazer and it’s already apparent so early in her career that she’s destined to do wonderful things.  She is every bit of a gift to little black girls aspiring to follow in her footsteps who are finally getting the message that no matter what we can do anything we want and be anything we want.